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    June 14, 1872
    Unions legalized in Canada
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  • JANUARY 2019
    Updated On: Feb 26, 2019

    AFGE sues government over shutdown
    Jan. 2, 2019 | The American Federation of Government Employees on Monday sued the U.S. government on behalf of federal employees being forced to work without pay during the Trump Shutdown. The lawsuit alleges that the government is violating the law by requiring some federal employees to work without pay, including correctional officers, Border Patrol and ICE agents, transportation security officers, and other employees who are labeled as “essential”. “Our members put their lives on the line to keep our country safe,” said AFGE president J. David Cox Sr., noting that positions that are considered ‘essential’ during a shutdown are some of the most dangerous jobs in the federal government. Pointing out that many of those working without pay are military veterans, Cox said that “Our nation’s heroes, AFGE members and their families deserve the decency of knowing when their next paycheck is coming and that they will be paid for their work.” The lawsuit was brought on behalf of all federal employees who are required to work without pay during the shutdown. The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has previously ruled in favor of federal employees forced to work without pay during the 2013 shutdown. ~ Via Metro Washington Council AFL-CIO

    Tribune Publishing CEOs are out after a series of controversies
    Jan. 18, 2019 | Top officials at Tribune Publishing, which owns the Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun and the New York Daily News, are leaving after a wave of controversies. Those affected include the newspaper chain's CEO and the two top officials of its digital arm, according to a memo sent to staffers Thursday from the new CEO, newspaper executive Timothy Knight… Like many peers, Tribune newspapers have struggled to find a winning formula and have undergone repeated cuts under current ownership. The recent history of Tribune Publishing involves a series of incidents in which executives stood accused of enriching themselves at the expense of their journalists. Now, news reports suggest Tribune Publishing has sought to rekindle interest from Gannett — itself the target of a hostile takeover bid by a newspaper company controlled by a hedge fund known for slashing its newspaper properties. Tribune remains very much on the block… NPR

    Labor hails DC City Council move to protect federal workers
    Jan. 23, 2019 | Some good news to share with family and friends affected by the government shutdown and are residents of DC: The DC City Council yesterday unanimously approved the “Federal Worker Housing Relief Emergency Act of 2019” to protect unpaid federal government workers and contractors from foreclosure, eviction, and late fees during a federal government shutdown. The bill, which takes effect immediately following the Mayor’s signature, would benefit as many as 80,000 federal workers and contractors living in DC. ...Metro Washington Council AFL-CIO


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