• General Membership Meetings
    Our union meetings are held every third Thursday of the month at the union hall, 6000 Erdman Ave. Baltimore, MD 21205. Start time is 5 p.m. Please be present and on time. (And bring a coworker.)

    Today in Labor History
    Feb. 20, 1895
    Frederick Douglass died on this date. In an 1857 address Douglass said, “If there is no struggle, there is no progress. Those who profess to favor freedom, and yet deprecate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground. They want rain without thunder and lightning. They want the ocean without the awful roar of its many waters. Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will”.
    ~ Voices of Labor

      Teamster News Headlines  
     
    Early Voting Begins in Minnesota
    Dairy Farmers of America, Dean Foods Reach $425 Million Deal
    Dairy Farmers of America Agrees to Buy Dean Foods, America’s Biggest Milk Producer, for $425 Million
    First Student NMA Update
    Black History Month Means More to Teamsters
    Striking N.Y. Workers' Wait Time for Unemployment Benefits Shortened
    Teamster Leader Submits Testimony, Sheds Light on XPO Warehouse Closure
    Local 727 Continues Fight For Members Rights At American Bottling Company
    Knowing the Past Opens the Door to the Future The Continuing Importance of Black History Month
    Episode 184: Jimmy Hoffa: In His Own Words
     
         
    • Local and National News

      Black History Month means more to the Teamsters
      Feb. 14, 2020 | For the Teamsters Union, black history isn’t just an add on to our story or a recognition of advancements. It is part of the core of our history. Black and white Teamsters rallied together after the Civil War to improve conditions, starting the first independent team driver locals. Black teamsters (and women teamsters for that matter) were part of the original conventions forming the Team Drivers International Union in 1898 and its spin-off The National Teamsters Union in 1902. T.A. Stowers (second from left in photo), a black delegate from Chicago was a leading voice at the 1903 convention to create the Teamsters Union as we know it today. He helped write the union’s constitution, yet few have heard of him. Stowers was the force behind adopting a creed vastly different from other unions, allowing members of any race, creed, gender or religion into the Teamsters. That’s a mainstay of our history and should be remembered… NJ Today

      Deadline fast approaching for this year’s Hoffa Memorial Scholarship
      Feb. 13, 2020 | The deadline for applying for an academic or vocational/training program scholarship from the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship Fund is March 2.  The college and vocational scholarship programs are available only for the sons, daughters and financial dependents of active and retired Teamsters. Visit the scholarship fund's website for information on who is eligible to apply and how to apply.

      Tribune offering buyouts after hedge fund becomes largest shareholder
      Jan. 15, 2020 | Tribune Publishing, the parent company of the Chicago Tribune, [the Baltimore Sun] and the struggling New York Daily News, is offering voluntary buyouts to [non-union] employees with eight or more years of service, it announced on Monday. “Although our digital successes provide good momentum, we continue to face industry-wide revenue challenges,” Tim Knight, president and CEO of Tribune Publishing, said in an email to employees at all nine Tribune newspapers. “Further, to reduce expenses and avoid turning to company-wide reductions of the workforce as a last resort, the company is offering this voluntary separation incentive plan to all eligible employees with eight or more years of company service.” NY Post

      Older news items can be viewed at 888 News.

      Elsewhere in The News
      Feb. 17, 2020 | BLACK HISTORY MONTH | […} The question that faces us today is whether or not Black History Month is still relevant. Is it still a vehicle for change? Or is it a useful concept whose goals have been achieved? I would like to suggest that despite the profound change in race relations that has occurred in our lives, Carter G. Woodson’s vision for black history as a means of transformation and change is still quite relevant and quite useful. African American history month, with a bit of tweaking, is still a beacon of change and hope that is still sorely needed in this world. The chains of slavery are gone—but we are all not yet free… Smithsonian National Museum of African American History & Culture

        • More tech workers are starting to unionize
        • It’s time to shorten the American workweek
        • Why America needs a better labor law
        • The great affordability crisis breaking America
        • Maryland comptroller bans disposable e-cigarettes
        • Chicago Teamster invents truck brake releaser system
        • Union endorsements will play a big role in the 2020 election
        • The largest federal employee union punches back at Trump
        • Why the PRO Act is a victory for workers and our democracy
        • Md. county becomes first in nation to ban hairstyle discrimination
        • Teamsters say goodbye to 30 years of U.S. government oversight


      Feb. 13, 2020 | LABOR LAW REFORM | […] Most Americans understand and appreciate the role that labor unions play; in fact, we’re more popular today than we’ve been in nearly 50 years. But union membership has been decimated over the last few decades, destroyed by laws designed to make it harder for workers to organize and negotiate contracts, and stifled by corporate-backed interests at the National Labor Relations Board and the Supreme Court. The most recent annual Gallup poll shows unions’ approval rating at 64 percent, while last month’s government tally of union membership shows the share of private-sector workers enrolled in unions to be a meager 6.2 percent—less than 10 percent of the share of Americans who approve of unions. That’s why now, more than ever, we need a new set of labor laws to help change the balance of the economy in this country so it’s fairer for the people who do its work… The American Prospect

      Feb. 11, 2020  | U.S. LABOR | Within the Department of Labor, there is a section that is devoted to providing oversight to labor unions. It is responsible for auditing financial disclosures and investigating officer corruption. Labor Secretary Eugene Scalia, has hired two new people to work in this oversight role who has a long history of working against unions. Rusty Brown, worked as a union-avoidance consultant. He helped to decertify a union of 27,000 home care workers in Minnesota and pushed the Labor Department to investigate a prominent Texas worker center that was a vocal critic of dangerous conditions in the construction industry. He will begin work in the Office of Labor-Management Standards (OLMS). The other hire, Trey Kovacs will work as a “special assistant” to OLMS… “It’s no surprise that the Trump Administration continues to pack the Department of Labor with people who are hostile to workers…” Trade & Union Digest

      Feb. 11, 2020 | BLACK HISTORY MONTH | Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week in 1926 and chose to celebrate it the second week of February because it marks the birthdays of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln, two men who left an indelible mark on African-American history. In addition to Douglass and Lincoln, W.E.B. DuBois, Langston Hughes, and Eubie Blake were also born in February and the founding of the NAACP and the first Pan African Congress took place during that month. Hiram Revels, the first African-American Senator took the oath of office in February 1870… Peoples World


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