• General Membership Meetings
    Our union meetings are held every third Thursday of the month at the union hall, 6000 Erdman Ave. Baltimore, MD 21205. Start time is 5 p.m. Please be present and on time. (And bring a coworker.)

    Today in Labor History
    Jan. 15, 1919: 
    Seventeen workers in the area die when a large molasses storage tank in Boston’s North End neighborhood bursts, sending a 40-foot wave of molasses surging through the streets at an estimated 35 miles per hour. In all, 21 people died and 150 were injured. The incident is variously known as the Boston Molasses Disaster, the Great Molasses Flood and the Great Boston Molasses Tragedy. Some residents claim that on hot summer days, the area still smells of molasses.
    ~ Union Communications Services


      Teamster News Headlines  
     
    Teamsters Reach Tentative Agreement for Southwest Airlines Material Specialists
    YRC Negotiations Resume, Continued Progress Reported
    Teamsters Ratify Contract at First Student of Sudbury, Mass.
    Port Truck Drivers Awarded Nearly $6 Million
    Teamsters Costco Bargaining Update, January 10, 2019
    Law Enforcement Appreciation Day
    Teamsters Applaud Bipartisan House Pension Reform Bill by Rep. Neal
    A-B Contract Proposal Raises Wages, Provides $4,000 Bonus, Protects Benefits
    NY Teamsters Reach Tentative Agreement With New York Housing Authority
    Hoffa: Congress, Stand for Workers
     
         
    • Local and National News

      AFGE sues government over shutdown
      Jan. 2, 2019 | The American Federation of Government Employees on Monday sued the U.S. government on behalf of federal employees being forced to work without pay during the Trump Shutdown. The lawsuit alleges that the government is violating the law by requiring some federal employees to work without pay, including correctional officers, Border Patrol and ICE agents, transportation security officers, and other employees who are labeled as “essential”. “Our members put their lives on the line to keep our country safe,” said AFGE president J. David Cox Sr., noting that positions that are considered ‘essential’ during a shutdown are some of the most dangerous jobs in the federal government. Pointing out that many of those working without pay are military veterans, Cox said that “Our nation’s heroes, AFGE members and their families deserve the decency of knowing when their next paycheck is coming and that they will be paid for their work.” The lawsuit was brought on behalf of all federal employees who are required to work without pay during the shutdown. The U.S. Court of Federal Claims has previously ruled in favor of federal employees forced to work without pay during the 2013 shutdown. ~ Via Metro Washington Council AFL-CIO

      Applications are being accepted for the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship
      Dec. 10, 2018 | The application process for the James R. Hoffa Memorial Scholarship for the 2019 year is now open. Scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $10,000 are awarded annually to eligible outstanding high school seniors. Applicants must be the son, daughter or grandchild of an active, retired, disabled, deceased or laid-off Teamster member who has or had at least twelve months of consecutive membership in good standing in the Teamsters Union. The submission deadline is March 31, 2019. Applications are available in English or Spanish, and are available online or at the Local office. For more information, click here.

      Older news items can be viewed at 888 News.

      June 29, 2018 | After one of the most lampooned rebrandings of the digital era, Tronc is going to return to the name Tribune Publishing. An insider said that the name change for the parent company of the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News was awaiting the completion of Tronc’s spinoff of the Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union-Tribune and several other papers in its California Media Group to health tech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong… MarketWatch Sept. 17, 2018 | While it still requires some deal jiu-jitsu, Tronc looks to be on the brink of being broken up. Will Wyatt’s new Donerail Group, several confidential sources tell me, has now gotten the financing in place to do a deal to buy Tronc. Donerail would purchase Tronc’s 10 daily newspaper properties, take the company private, and then most likely sell the papers off to individual buyers — some of whom it already has lined up… Neiman Lab Sept. 17, 2018 | A second firm is in talks to potentially acquire Chicago-based newspaper chain Tronc. California-based newspaper chain McClatchy is in “early stage” discussions to buy Tronc, owner of the Chicago Tribune and other major newspapers, a source familiar with the negotiations said Friday. McClatchy, a publicly traded company, generated about $904 million in revenue last year, according to filings with the SEC… Chicago Tribune
      June 29, 2018 | After one of the most lampooned rebrandings of the digital era, Tronc is going to return to the name Tribune Publishing. An insider said that the name change for the parent company of the Chicago Tribune and the New York Daily News was awaiting the completion of Tronc’s spinoff of the Los Angeles Times, San Diego Union-Tribune and several other papers in its California Media Group to health tech billionaire Patrick Soon-Shiong… MarketWatch
      Sept. 17, 2018 | While it still requires some deal jiu-jitsu, Tronc looks to be on the brink of being broken up. Will Wyatt’s new Donerail Group, several confidential sources tell me, has now gotten the financing in place to do a deal to buy Tronc. Donerail would purchase Tronc’s 10 daily newspaper properties, take the company private, and then most likely sell the papers off to individual buyers — some of whom it already has lined up… Neiman Lab
      Sept. 17, 2018 | A second firm is in talks to potentially acquire Chicago-based newspaper chain Tronc. California-based newspaper chain McClatchy is in “early stage” discussions to buy Tronc, owner of the Chicago Tribune and other major newspapers, a source familiar with the negotiations said Friday. McClatchy, a publicly traded company, generated about $904 million in revenue last year, according to filings with the SEC… Chicago Tribune

      Elsewhere in The News
      Jan. 14, 2019 | COLLECTIVE ACTION |  After nearly two years of bargaining, public-school teachers in Los Angeles have initiated a strike in protest of their district’s policies. Starting today, teachers are picketing outside of their workplaces, underscoring an inveterate lack of investment in public schools made worse by a pro-charter-school “austerity agenda.” From April of 2017 to January of this year, United Teachers of Los Angeles (UTLA)—which represents more than 35,000 teachers, nurses, librarians and counselors in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD)—had been in negotiations with the district, and eventually reached an impasse… Working In These Times

        • States lead the way on retirement security
        • Port truck drivers awarded nearly $6 million
        • Prison officer suing after working without pay
        • I am a teacher in LA and I’m ready to go on strike
        • Why federal workers still have to show up for work…
        
      3 Social Security changes that could impact you this year
        • Trump promised to bring jobs back. His tariffs threaten to send them away
        • Minimum wage, health care expected to dominate Md. General Assembly


      Jan. 11, 2019 | WAGES |  Since Dec. 22, furloughed workers and those working without pay have been living off their savings, credit cards and the last paychecks that landed in their accounts. But many of those wells are now dry. And as President Trump warns that the shutdown could last months or years if Democrats do not agree to fund his border wall, unpaid federal workers across the country, from the Washington suburbs to farming towns to remote federal prisons, are growing increasingly desperate and furious at the political impasse. They are now in shutdown survival mode: opening new credit card accounts to pay off their bills, borrowing from relatives and eating the dregs of their pantries… New York Times

      Jan. 11, 2019 | JOINT EMPLOYERS |  […] Recently, the Washington, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a major ruling that was a win for workers, and now this issue seems destined for the Supreme Court. As the legal battle heats up, workers everywhere should be paying close attention, since their livelihoods—or unions—could be affected. Under a traditional employment relationship, workers have one employer who has the power to hire, fire, pay, supervise and direct them. If such workers form a union, the law requires the employer to recognize the union and bargain in good faith. However, there is a growing group of blue-collar, white-collar and service workers who find themselves working for two employers, either through contractors or temporary help firms… Working In These Times 

      Jan. 8, 2019 | WAGES | Elected lawmakers who oppose minimum wages hikes often belittle their effectiveness. But the more than 5 million workers who saw their pay go up this week due to local and state increases probably see it a lot differently. The 19 states that raised their wage floors lifted pay for some 5.3 million workers nationally. Some will see their income rise by as much as $2 an hour or $1,300 a year. Eight of the increases reflect automatic adjustments for inflation, while six were due to state laws approved by lawmakers. The final six are the result of ballot measures backed by voters. Meanwhile, workers in 24 U.S. cities and counties also experienced a wage hike with the dawning of 2019. Taken together, the minimum wage now surpasses the abysmal $7.25 an hour federal standard in 29 states… Teamsters


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