• Today in Labor History
    July 8, 1966
    From July 8 to August 19, 1966, over 35,000 airline workers across the nation employed by five airlines went on strike. After several years of stilted wage gains as the airline industry invested heavily in jet technology, aircraft mechanics and other ground service workers represented by the International Association of Machinists (IAM) were anxious to share in the substantial profits of 1965. Facing a bargaining impasse between the IAM and the five carriers (United, Northwest, National, Trans World and Eastern) covered in the industry’s first multi-carrier labor contract, a Presidential Emergency Board presented a “compromise” package. In the summer of 1966, IAM members rejected this compromise and walked off the job in the largest strike in airline history. For 43 days during the peak summer travel season, 60 percent of the U.S. commercial airline industry was literally inoperative as 35,000 workers stayed out on strike.
    ~ Voices of Labor

  • MAY 2018
    Updated On: Jun 25, 2018

    Under pressure, Tronc recognizes ‘Chicago Tribune’ union
    May 8, 2018 |  The troubled Tronc media company agreed Sunday evening to recognize unions to represent journalists in negotiations at its Chicago-area publication. It is a notable reversal for Tronc, historically known in various corporate iterations for its hostility to organized labor. In Chicago, organizers said they had collected signed union cards from more than 85 percent of the more than 280 journalists they sought to represent. The reversal of fortunes in Chicago is likely to embolden newsroom employees at other Tronc papers, such as the company's publications in Hartford, Conn.; Orlando, Fla.; and South Florida. The Baltimore Sun newsroom is already unionized… NPR

    Make your voice heard: Say NO to ‘skinny’ NAFTA
    May 25, 2018 | Since 1994, NAFTA has devastated working families, putting corporate profits ahead of people. What's worse is that NAFTA has become the blueprint for all other trade agreements, from the way that it was negotiated in secret, to the bad provisions that have made their way into every agreement that has been signed since then, to strong language protecting workers being left out of those new agreements. A ‘skinny’ NAFTA wouldn’t include important protections for American workers, and that is unacceptable to Teamster members. Today’s NAFTA protects corporations, but there were promises that NAFTA 2.0 would protect working families. NAFTA 2.0 must be negotiated in the open, with input from working families, environmental groups and everyday Americans. A ‘skinny’ NAFTA would exclude all of these voices, and just be more of the same bad trade policy that caters to corporate interests. Use your voice to tell the U.S. trade representative to stay at the table until working families get the deal they need.

    Tronc blocks European readers over new privacy rules
    May 25, 2018 | American news outlets including The Chicago Tribune, The Los Angeles Times and The Arizona Daily Star abruptly blocked access to their websites from Europe on Friday, choosing to black out readers rather than comply with a strict new data privacy law in the European Union that limits what information can be collected about people online. The most notable blackouts were by news organizations tied to the American media company Tronc. In addition to The Chicago Tribune and Los Angeles Times, newspapers including The New York Daily News, The Orlando Sentinel and The Baltimore Sun were also unavailable to readers in Europe… New York Times


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